Comment Policy

Since this is my blog, I’ve decided to set some ground rules for comments. Here they are:

  • Differing opinions are welcome and valued!
  • I expect all comments to be respectful of me (as your host) and of other commenters. If you disagree with another comment, please do it without finding it necessary to exercise your desire to hurt or diminish the author of said comment OR run the risk of your comment being deleted.
  • I don’t mind criticism, but if you feel so compelled please criticize respectfully and constructively or run the risk of your comment being deleted.  Challenge me, get me thinking, but keep the third-grade name-calling where it belongs – on the playground.
  • Obviously I don’t say anything anonymously; if you have something important to say, perhaps you shouldn’t either (but it’s your choice.)
  • I delete comments that embody the non-creative use of profanity.  If you’re going to curse, you’d better be as good at is as Naomi Dunford (or bloody forget it!)

and

One final but really important thing:  my intention in this endeavor is to attract and interact with people who are more interested in being happy than right.  If you’re more interested in being right than happy, this might not be the place for you.  (Besides, it’s a lot more fun and feels a lot better to be happy than to be right.)

If you’re one of my people chances are you get that.  You’ve been unhappy, confused or wandering and wondering too long to care about complaining, judging or criticizing others.  You just want some peace already!

What that means for the rest of you is this: I didn’t start this blog to engage in debate or philosophical discourse.  If what you read makes you compelled to argue, attempt to convert me or other readers to your way of thinking, condemn, judge  or name-call, please read this.  If that doesn’t change what you’re feeling, I suggest taking your energy and your comments elsewhere.

Not that healthy debate isn’t sometimes warranted and certainly justified, it’s just that here I’m more concerned with heart than intellect.  The ego – and by extension the mind – always wants to be right because to consider the new and unconventional threatens its sense of security and its very existence.

The heart, on the other hand, always wants to be happy.

You decide where you want to live from – heart or mind – just be clear where I stand.  This is a heart-centered place for truth-centered people. There are no accidents, victims, or coincidences.

I think you get the point.  ‘Nough said.